Trail cam: Lazy Otter
Trail cam: Raccoon playing in water
Trail cam: den and fox family
Trail cam: fox and cubs
Trail cam: bobcat
Forestry Club teaches first graders how to measure trees.
Workers proceed with a Spring controlled burn.
Tree core reveals tree age to aid in management decisions - Wisconsin
Forestry Club students and Smokey Bear teaching first graders about Forestry - Wisconsin
Learning proper tree-climbing techniques - Wisconsin
Blanding's turtle
Birch polypore (Piptoporus betulinus) conks on paper birch in northern Wisconsin
Wild turkey research - Wisconsin
Students collect forest stand data for management plan - Wisconsin
Students learning field techniques during wildlife ecology summer camp - Wisconsin
White-tailed deer fawn - Wisconsin
Pine seedling – Woodruff Wisconsin

The mission of the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology is to provide science-based research, instruction, and extension that supports forest and wildlife conservation and management in an ecologically, economically, and socially sustainable fashion.

The Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology had its origin in 1933 when the University of Wisconsin-Madison created a Chair in Game Management for Professor Aldo Leopold.  Six years later, Leopold formed the Department of Wildlife Management, the first academic department in the world dedicated to the emerging field of wildlife management.  Forestry research was conducted in several college programs and in 1959, the Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management was created to organize forestry and wildlife research under one program.

In 1962, the college created separate Departments of Forestry and Wildlife Management.  A further change in 1967 created the Department of Wildlife Ecology, a name more in keeping with the Department's emphasis on the inter-relationships of animals and their physical environment.  In 1997, the department name was changed to the Department of Forest Ecology and Management.  The two departments were again combined in 2007 to form the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology.

Seminars

  • Fri, 09/23/2016
    Eating and not dying: How mammals cope with dietary toxins

Giving to Forest and Wildlife Ecology

We deeply appreciate the support we receive from loyal alumni and friends.  Private gifts provide scholarships for deserving undergraduates, enable us to attract the best and brightest graduate students, help us to retain the most talented faculty and staff, and provide support for new initiatives.

Make a gift online

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